The Importance of Palliative Care

Palliative Care is “Living as well as you can, as long as you can.”

Benzi Kluger, MD, MS

You may have heard the term Palliative Care, but do you know what it means? Most people think it is hospice. However, hospice is only a small part of it. The focus of palliative care (also known as supportive care) is on improving quality of life by addressing medical symptoms, psychosocial issues, spiritual well-being, and planning for the future.

PD advocate Kirk Hall has worked extensively with Benzi Kluger, MD, MS to develop a Palliative Care program for people with Parkinson’s, much of it based on Kirk’s personal experiences and interactions with other patients and carepartners. They have many recommendations for changes or incremental actions to improve patient quality of life. 

Please join me and guest Kirk Hall on Sunday, January 15 at 1:00 PM EST, 10:00 AM PST This program is open to everyone.

Kirk will talk about what Palliative Care means for those of us with Parkinson’s Disease and why it is so important for us. This webinar is open to everyone and there is no charge.

You must register here to join us. The webinar will be recorded and available for viewing later on my Youtube channel.

How is winter treating you?

For those of us in the US and Canada, it has been a particularly rough winter, even here in Sunny Southern California. After several years of severe drought conditions, we have been pounded by the “atmospheric river” that is dumping huge amounts of rain and snow across the western US. I find that the cold and damp really affect how I feel. When the barometric pressure drops, my joints ache, I move slower and my tremor acts up. A cup of hot tea, a good book and a warm weighted blanket to curl up in are all I want. In fact, I think that is what I need to do as the rain has just started again.

See you on Sunday Morning!

A Note To My Readers


I love to see your comments and get your emails as we share our collective experiences. But based on a couple of private questions from some of you, remember, I am just a lay person and a patient like the rest of you. For medical and similar advice, you need to talk to your own doctor

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