Thank you Alan Alda

I decided to let people know I have Parkinson’s to encourage others to take action. I was Diagnosed 3 and a half years ago, but my life is full. I act, I give talks, I do my podcast, which I love. If you get a diagnosis, keep moving!

Watching Alan Alda’s interview on CBS this morning was inspiring and uplifting.  Mr. Alda could possibly be the best celebrity spokesperson, after Michael J Fox, for getting the word out that Parkinson’s is not a death sentence.  In a 7 minute interview, he covered so much of what my fellow bloggers and I have been writing about, and the most important message he gave is to “keep moving.”  I can’t repeat that message often enough, because it has worked so well for me and many other Parkies that I know, for the last 10 years.

Watch his inspiring video here:

https://www.cbsnews.com/video/alan-alda-reveals-parkinsons-disease-diagnosis/

Alda insisted that his doctor test him for Parkinson’s after reading an article about how one of the early signs of Parkinson’s is acting out dreams, which he was doing.   One of his first symptoms a short time later was a twitch in his thumb.  His reaction was not fear.  He wanted to help his family understand the disease and stressed that each person with Parkinson’s experiences the disease differently, even from day to day.

He sees PD as a puzzle to be solved.  You have to figure out the pieces of the puzzle that work for you to carry on a normal life.  It is a challenge that you must meet and you have to find a way to approach it.  He enjoys solving puzzles, something that I enjoy as well.

Alda approaches life with enthusiasm and hopefully will inspire others to do as he does:  keep on moving.  He boxes 3 times a week, plays tennis twice a week, and marches to Sousa music.  He says that marching to music is very powerful for PD.

Most importantly, he wants to get the word out that Parkinson’s Disease should not be feared and that there are things you can do to live well with PD.

“… I think because I’m sort of well-known, it might be helpful to people to hear the message that there are things you can do. You can learn about things and not follow quackery, but find out what real science is coming up with. That helps. It helps to keep moving. It helps to move rhythmically,”

I hope that Mr. Alda will consider coming to the World Parkinson’s Congress next June in Kyoto.  His message of hope is powerful and it needs to be shared with the Parkinson’s community and with the world.

Responses to Getting Past Denial

[animated-france-flag-image-0019This was written before the awful news from Paris today.  Our hearts go out to the families of all those affected by this senseless hatred.]

Today is a big day.  Thanks to all of you, Twitchy Woman has passed 1000 viewers.  What started last March with a posting called In the Beginning that had just 15 views in the first month, Twitchy Woman now has at least 60 followers from many different countries.  If you have not officially signed up to follow please do so by clicking on the Follow button to the right so that you won’t miss out on future postings.  The most viewed post was Things I Never Thought I Would Do, a short post about signing up for Boxing classes, followed by Seeking Self-Efficacy and Livin’ La Levadopa.

Since my goal was to create a forum for readers to share their experiences about living with Parkinson’s Disease, I would like to share a couple of responses from the last post “Getting Past Denial”

Myrna writes:

“When I was first diagnosed three and a half years ago, I fell into a pit of self-pity and depression that I couldn’t remember ever feeling before. I began to read everything about the illness that I could get my hands on, and I stumbled into a support group for Parkinson’s that I attended the very first week after I was diagnosed and it was a lifesaver.  Strangers gave me information, invited me to conferences on Parkinson’s, and befriended me in telephone conversations about the illness that helped me ever so much.   I read Michael J. Fox’s three books along with other authors too, and they were immeasurably helpful.   But denial is powerful and seductive and pops up in my heart and mind from time to time, despite the clarity of the illness to myself and others. Because so far the illness is progressing slowly, I find myself thinking, ‘I couldn’t really have Parkinson’s.’  Yet I know I have it without a doubt.”

From PD in Arizona:

“My Diagnosis…The New Me

It was early 2014 and we celebrated surviving the stress and sleepless nights of an extensive condo remodel in Scottsdale. Because we love the area and the wonderful condo enhancement, it prompted us to return home to WI, sell our home and relocate to AZ. In March ‘14 we noticed a strange ‘twitch’ in my left hand. My husband Brad and I both just instinctively knew it was a red flag. We never said the words, but unbeknownst to one another, we secretly Googled and read the symptoms: Oh NO…the ‘P’ word (Parkinson’s)!!??

I was diagnosed in June ’14 and it was the diagnosis I dreaded, but expected due to the classic tremors. My initial fear was that I’ll become an awful burden to my husband and apologized to him for my disease and ‘ruining’ our lives. We shed some tears and shared our honest feelings. I was numb and scared. How did this happen…to me??” My husband encouraged me to inform my siblings, but because both live in different states it was via “that phone call.” We then shared with other family members and our close friends. I heard nothing but positive, supportive feedback from all.

Although PD is more than daunting, very early on I let go and accepted my disease. It’s always been my nature to remain positive. Brad told me, ‘It’s the new you!’ I’ve embraced it by remaining educated and have infused quite the sense of humor. I often crack jokes about my twitches (both hands and a leg). I can’t hide it, so what other choice to I have? After all, everybody has something! And as I look at others around me I am so grateful I don’t have a brain tumor (like the one that took my dear friend) or losing my eyesight like another close friend. But don’t get me wrong. I’ve had a few bad days too like the time my husband found me closet crying, “I’ll never be normal again.” After conversation and hugs I pick myself up and move on.

Truly, I have so much to be thankful for: a loving supportive husband, an outpouring of caring family and friends who keep me in their prayers. I love that my best Rx is exercise; I’ve become involved with several clinical studies; and adore my network at the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center. I walked my first PD 5K last year with my team and raised $2600 for the MAPC outreach programs, (which I – like Twitchy Women, also accidently posted on FB…one of the best things I’ve done.) I’m sure you guessed by now – my circle is quite aware that I have PD and I wear it like a badge of courage. They know that I’m a fighter and doing great. But, every single day…I still optimistically pray for that life-changing medical discovery or cure! We are getting close and it WILL happen!”

I would love to hear from more of you. 

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with me at twitchywoman18@gmail.com to suggest other topics, or submit something to be posted.  As we say in Boxing for PD, we are all Fighters together in the fight against Parkinson’s.

Other interesting news from the web:

In case you missed it, here is a link to the terrific piece about Rock Steady Boxing that aired on CBS Sunday Morning:  Fighting back against Parkinson’s in the Ring

Using wearables to tackle Parkinson’s

Baseball Legend Kirk Gibson Has Parkinson’s Disease, Says It is Not a Death Sentence

And finally, an article sent to me about a breakthrough in crossing the blood-brain-barrier that has implications for future treatments for PD.  Canadian doctor first to break blood-brain-barrier.  And a related article:  Canadian Doctors Perform Breakthrough Blood-Brain Barrier Surgery Using Focused Ultrasound.